27 Characteristics of the hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

Phantom picture of the hand in Down syndrome!

In 1963 L.S. Penrose presented the first ‘phantom picture’ describing the typical hand characteristics in Down syndrome. More detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were presented by Schaumann & Alter (1976), Rodewald (1981). This month (2010) a more detailed updated version of the visualisation became available – featuring 27 characteristics of the hand in Down’s syndrome!

What are the most common hand characteristics in Down syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of a Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the hypothenar zone of the hand (in palmistry a.k.a. ‘mount of moon’); usually this zone a large ‘ulnar loop’ pattern combined with a high positioned palmar axial triradius.

HAND SHAPE:
Short fingers (thumb and pinky finger are often abnormally short) + a square shaped palm.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Down syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in all cases of Down syndrome certain combinations of the 27 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

More details available at:
How to use the famous ‘single palmar crease’ (a.k.a. simian line) as a marker in hand diagnostics!

Photo: example of a baby hand in Down syndrome

Example of a baby hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

Doctors in the Sawai Man Singh hospital in Jaipur, India, study potential link between palmistry and HIV (AIDS)!

Doctors in the Sawai Man Singh hospital in Jaipur, India, study potential link between palmistry and HIV (AIDS)!

What is the link between palmistry and HIV (AIDS)? Doctors in Jaipur, India, study the answer!

5 Doctor researchers are studying the hand lines of HIV patients to see if they have changed in any way or if they look any different from the hand lines of normal and healthy people!

Palmistry is a common practise in India for reading people’s personalities, matchmaking between men and women, and for reading their future from the palm of the hand. Now the doctors hope the research may find a connection between palmistry and HIV cases.

HIV (AIDS) concerns a big medical problem in India: around 2.5 million men, women and children are living with the human immuno-deficiency virus, commonly known as HIV. This is about the third in the world after Nigeria and South Africa.

The 5 doctors hope that their study will open a new chapter in identifying and curing HIV patients.

Doctor D.K. Mathur, heading the HIV- dermatoglyphics research said:

“… There’s been hardly any research on dermatoglyphics and its relationship with HIV. We thought that if HIV AIDS have any effect on this (dermatoglyphics) or if there are changes in palm lines if a person is seriously affected by HIV. We’ll study palm printouts of 250 HIV patients and 100 palm printouts of healthy people. We’ll do a comparative study to find what are the major differences in whirls and ridges of palms of these people so that HIV people can be given a cure.”

The study has been cautiously been welcomed by the ‘Rajasthan Network for people living with HIV’.

SUGGESTION FOR FURTHER READING:

Doctors study link between Palmistry & HIV!
Palm reading goes medical
24 Percent of Indians consult a palmist!
Palmistry reports: news, articles & readings
What your physique reveals about your health!

The hand of Albert Einstein!

The hand of Albert Einstein!

Albert Einstein’s hand shows signs of Asperger sydrome – the high IQ variant of autism:

Researchers at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford believe that Albert Einstein showed signs of Asperger’s Syndrome.

Marianne Raschig was able to make a handprint of Albert Einstein’s hands in 1930. Does Einstein have the typical hand features that researchers have observed in autism?

Albert Einstein’s handprints are presented at the bottom of this post (the high quality versions are available at: THE HANDS OF ALBERT EINSTEIN). Let’s take a look at the hand characteristics that have been associated with autism in varioius scientific studies:

2D:4D Finger ratio

Professor John T. Manning described in 2002 in his first book titled: ‘Digit Ratio‘ that the hand in autism is often characterised by a by a ‘2D:4D finger ratio’ of 0.94 of lower. Interestingly Albert Einstein’s digit ratio appeared to be close to 0.93!

Fingerprints

Some Romanian researchers described in 2003 some significant results related to fingerprint asymmetries between the the right hand and the left hand. They described that they found that the hands of persons who have autism are often featured with more ‘arch’ fingerprints in the left hand and/or more ‘loop’ fingerprints in the right hand. Interestingly, Albert Einstein has 2 ‘loops’ (middle finger + pinky) in his right hand and only one ‘loop’ in his left hand (pinky)!

Unusual hand lines

In time various scientific studies have reported that the hand in autism is frequently featured with unsual palmar lines. The most important unusual palmar lines are: ‘the simian crease‘ & ‘the Sydney line‘. Interestingly, Albert Einstein has an (incomplete) Sydney line in his left hand!

The handprints of Albert Einstein.

The Sydney line: a.k.a. an extended 'head line' or 'proximal palmar transverse crease'.

No less than exactly 40 years ago articles in the famous Time Magazine and the Lancet revealed that certain characteristics in the hand lines can signal major medical problems. A few hand facts from 1969!

The patterns of the fingerprints and the palmar lines are established by the fourth fetal month of life in the womb, when the fetus’ hand is only a few millimeters long. The more conspicuous “flexion creases” (the palmist’s “heart, head and life lines”) are formed a month or two earlier.

In normal palms, the heart and head lines are separate and distinct, and neither extends clear across the palm. However, in many victims of Down’s syndrome, prenatal rubella, childhood leukemia, and even in Alzheimer dementia, the palmar lines are replaced by a Sydney line (see picture above), or a single “simian crease” (see picture below) – characteristics which are quite normal like that on a monkey’s palm!

Source: Time Magazine

SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING:

The Sydney line: an underestimated hand mark!
The simian crease: a notorious hand line!
More about your hands

Deciphering the simian line.