In 2011 CNN made a report about ‘Wonderful Minds’ – a company in Singapore that uses dermatoglyphics to assess learning ability style of little children in order to provide a ‘guide’ to parents.

A thorough discussion of this technique – better known as: ‘Dermatoglyphic Multiple Intelligence Test’ or DMIT – is available at the Modern Hand Reading Forum.

Let us know what you think about this ‘service’!

Zhang Haiguo, an expert in dermatoglyphics, has earlier this month been awarded the Lifetime Achievement Prize for Anthropology by The Shanghai Anthropological Association. 

The 62-year-old native from Shanghai became e.g. known for collecting dermatoglyphic variables from China’s 56 ethnic groups in an attempt to trace their origins and migratory route over a period of 30 years. Zhang Haiguo’s team has collected more than 150 samples by surveying more than 68,000 Chinese from all 56 ethnic groups – his study became known as the world’s first research of dermatoglyphic variables involving all ethnic groups of a country.

Zhang Haiguo  has divided the ethnic groups into north and south groups. The research presents some surprising discoveries. For example, Tibetans’ origins could be traced from the very north of China, instead of India as popularly believed.

Zhang Gaoshan ethnic group, a community in Taiwan, was found to have originated from the Chinese mainland instead of from the islands of the South Pacific regions.

The professor says the research will also help in the study of some genetic diseases like Down’s syndrome. Based on his research, Zhang concludes that the disease will happen to one of every 690 Chinese people.

 Zhang says he is currently exploring a new research method, which combines generic and dermatoglyphic research in a bid to better decipher the origins of ethnic groups.

“Which section of DNA decides people’s fingerprints? It has been a dilemma for scientists around the world, and I hope my years of study can shed some light,” he says.

Palm Reading?

When asked about his opinion on telling one’s fortune through palm reading, he says:

“I have perhaps seen more palms than most fortune tellers. But I don’t think someone can tell others’ fortune through palms. Someone invited me to join fortune telling 20 years ago, but I refused.”

 Haiguo is currently a professor from the School of Life Sciences in Fudan University and a former associate professor from the department of medical genetics in Shanghai Jiaotong University’s School of Medicine. Zhang has published more than 70 articles and six books on dermatoglyphics. But his latest findings are compiled in a book, Dermatoglyphics of China’s 56 Ethnic Groups, which was published in July. His research data has also been published on PLoS ONE, an international peer-reviewed online publication of the US Public Library of Science.

Via: ChinaDaily.com



What discriminates ‘Multi-Perspective Palm Reading’ from all other approaches in the field of hand reading?

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading is a new type of hand reading that is rising from scientific research reports that relate to the hand as a ‘diagnostic tool’. The unique characteristic of this advanced type of palm reading is that it only includes hand markers which have been confirmed to have significant value according scientific studies. So this NEXT NATURE variant of ‘palmistry’ is not connected anyhow with astrology nor any other philosophic system.

In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading is the hand studied from 7 different perspectives in order to make an assessment for various specified themes – which can result in either a confirming- or prognostic ‘hand-diagnosis’.


The philosophy behind Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

The philosophy behind this new advanced type of hand reading can be described as follows:

“In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, a reliable hand-diagnosis is only possible when a pair of hands displays ‘diagnostic clues’ in MULTIPLE perspectives of the hand. According Multi-Perspective Palm Reading a person typically requires to have ‘diagnostic clues’ in at least 3 perspectives of his/her hands, before one can speak of a solid, specified hand-diagnosis.

The application of this philosophy in the practice for making a hand assessment can be understood by studying the role of the simian line in hand diagnostics. In the 20th century the simian line (the most well known of all palm line variations: a.k.a. the single palmar transverse crease or simian crease) became known as a diagnostic marker for Down syndrome. However, during the past decades this uncommon hand marker was recognized as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ that has diagnostic value for other syndromes, diseases & developmental problems. But in order to specify it’s significance as a major hand line for the individual that has this characteristic in one or both hands, a study of the other perspectives of the hand is required!


The 7 perspectives used in Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

In the following seven perspectives are required to be studied in order to make a thorough hand assessment:

1 – Palm Reading & the HAND SHAPE, including e.g.: hand index, palm shape, hand length, hand breath.

2 – Palm Reading & the FINGERNAILS, including e.g.: color, morphology, structure, growth.

3 – Palm Reading & FINGER MORPHOLOGY, including e.g.: finger length, 2D:4D ratio, variations in shape & width.

4 – Palm Reading & the MAJOR LINES, including e.g.: primary creases, secundary creases, tertairy creases & accessory lines.

5 – Palm Reading & the DERMATOGLYPHICS, including e.g.: fingerprints, palmar dermatoglyphics.

6 – Palm Reading & SKIN QUALITY, including e.g.: colour, structure, flexure / tone.

7 – Palm Reading & HAND MOTORICS, including e.g.: flexibility, motoric hand index.

Read more about how Multi-Perspective Palm Reading varies from other types of hand reading & modern palmistry via the Wikipedia section: Modern Palmistry: science & criticism

Sweat drops in the pores of the skin ridges (dermatoglyphs)

Many people sometimes wonder about the function of their ‘fingerprints’. Why do we have them? The answer is foundstarts in the sweat pores!

As you probably know, the whole body is featured with sweat pores (featured with eccrine sweat glands) – except for the lips & the sexual organs.
 
But in the hands & the feet the sweat pores have a highly specialized role. Because in the inner palm and on the sole the sweat pores manifest on so-called ‘friction ridge skin’ – the so-called skin ridges (see the picture above) that became especially known in the perspective of the fingerprints.
 
Skin ridges & grooves!
 
In the skin ridges the sweat pores are found – in a fingerprint the ridges manifest as the ‘black lines’ and in a high quality fingerprint one can sometimes even see the sweat fore: see the picture below!
 
The surrounding ‘grooves’ serve as a transport channel to distribute the sweat through the hands & feet. And the combination of these element prevent our hands & feet to become ‘slippy’!
 
Because skin friction arises from the interaction between the sweat & the skin of the body, and is directly related to the area of the surface of the body that is in contact with the fluid. An important feature in order to have effective ‘grip’ in your hands!
 
“But keep your head cool, otherwise your sweat glands will start produce too much moisture resulting in a reduced grasp stability!”
 
 
Learn more about the life in the skin of your hand:

Discover 20 skin-facts you didn’t know – including hands, fingerprints & dermatoglyphics!

 
The “Preacher Sign” involves the inability to flatten the hands against each other – a hand characteristic that is frequently seen in diabetes mellitus patients.

Diabetes mellitus belongs to a category of diseases that is known for having quite a few hand markers that ‘signal’ the development of the disease. Type 1 and type 2 have many common characteristics regarding the hands, but one has to be aware that some of them are limited to only one variant of the disease.

The most revealing dimensions of the hand in diabeter are: the MOTORICS (including the “Preacher Sign”), the FINGERNAILS, the SKIN QUALITY & the DERMATOGLYPHICS. And even the notorious simian crease is about twice to four times more often seen among diabetic patients – compared to the general population.
The following article presents an overview of 33 hand markers for Diabetes Mellitis – type 2 (all reported features have been confirms as ‘signficant’ in various scientific studies:
 
 
(A ‘phantom picture’ for the hand in diabetes will become available later)

In 1983 American developmental psychologist Dr. Howard Gardner argued that the concept of intelligence as traditionally defined in psychometrics (IQ tests) does not sufficiently describe the wide variety of cognitive abilities humans display. His theory became know under the name ‘Multiple Intelligence’ (MI). A few years ago a rather remarkable commercial spin-off from Gardner’s theory became available: a product named the DMIT, which stands for: ‘Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligence Test’.

The origins of the DMIT test were developed in Taiwan,  and became available in various Asian countries as a franchise product. The product claims to be a scientific product focussed on assessing the ‘multiple intelligences’ of young children. Basically, the product suggests that one can assess Gardner’s multiple intelligences via the 10 fingerprints of your hand. And the assumption is made that each finger is connected with the 5 brain lobes of the hemispheres (see the picture below).

Is the DMIT a valid test?

So far there appears to be no public research available to answer this question – though an intelligent reader could recognize from this point solely a clue about the nature of this so-called ‘scientific test’. 

By the way, Gardner’s theory describes only eight basic types of intelligence to date – though without claiming that this is a complete list. Gardner’s original list included only seven of these, but in 1999 he added a naturalist intelligence. He has also considered existential intelligence and moral intelligence, but does not find sufficient evidence for these based upon his articulated criteria.

Howard Garnder’s ‘multiple intelligences’:

More detailed considerations + links to GeneCode & ThumbRule DMIT websites are available at the Modern Hand Reading Forum:

IQ TEST: Does your intelligence correlate with your fingerprints & dermatoglyphics?

The family tree of fingerprint types

In 1943 Cummins & Midlo presented a work which became known as the Bible of fingerprints, titled: “Finger Prints, Palms and Soles”. The book is e.g. featured with a model named: ‘a family tree of finger print types’: see the picture above.

This ‘family tree’ presents an interesting perspective on how various types of fingerprints are related. Starting with the ‘concentric whorl’ (which sort of raises associations with various phenomena – such as: a solar system in the cosmos, or force fields in the atmosphere, hair streams on the human body, etc.), progressing via the ‘loop’, and ending with the ‘simple arch’ (which raises associations with more stable, inert phenomena).

At Amazon you can order a copy of ‘Finger prints, Palms and Soles’, or another fingerprint book (such as: ‘The Science of Fingerprints’ – a FBI production). For more details about the book, see: Google books & Ed Campbell’s article ‘Fingerprints & Palmar Dermatoglyphics.

Related news reports & articles are available at:                                           Fingerprints &  dermatoglyphics news.

DERMATOGLYPHICS: An introduction to the dermatoglyphs of the human hand.

Dermatoglyphics – a moment of science!

The word ‘dermatoglyphics‘ was first coined by Harold Cummins in 1926, and refers to the study of the characteristics in the skin ridges of the hands and the feet. What are the most common dermatoglyphic characteristics?

FINGERPRINTS:

In most populations around the world is the ‘ulnar loop’ the most observed fingerprint pattern (see: the fingerprint of the pinky finger in the picture above). Loops are most frequently found on the little finger (and middle finger); loops are least frequently found on the pointer finger.
In some Asian populations the ‘whorl’ (see: the fingerprint of the ring finger in the picture above) is more common than the ‘ulnar loop’. Whorls are more often seen on the thumb and ring finger.
In population research usually the pointer finger demonstrates more variation than the the other fingers. For example the most common ‘ulnar loop’ is least often seen on the pointer finger, which often exhibits an other pattern such as: the ‘arch’, ‘tented arch’, ‘whorl’ or ‘radial loop’ (see: the pointer finger in the picture above).

PALMAR DERMATOGLYPHICS:

The variations in the dermatoglyphics of the handpalm are much more complex than the variations in the fingerprints. An important element concerns the presence of the ‘palmar triradii’ (see: a, b, c, d, and t in the picture above): normally each finger is featured with a palmar triradius – triradius t belongs to the thumb (the thumb mouse – a.k.a. as the ‘thenar’, or in palmistry: ‘mount of Venus’ could be recognized as the third phalange of the thumb).
However, the number of palmar triradii varies with the presence of palmar ‘loops’ (or: palmar ‘whorls’). Usually the link between the number of fingers (D = digits), palmar triradii (T) and palmar loops (L) can be described with the following formula, which is known as the Penrose topological formula (Lionel Penrose, 1965):

T = L + D – 1

More details available via:
The history of research in fingerprints & dermatoglyphics – a review!

Picture: example of a normal pattern of dermatoglypics [NOTICE: If the ‘c-line’ is ending between the ring- and middle finger it always creates a palmar ‘loop’, which implicates that the author of the picture has missed 6th palmar triradius between/below the c and d triradius]

Palmar dermatoglyphics.

27 Characteristics of the hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

Phantom picture of the hand in Down syndrome!

In 1963 L.S. Penrose presented the first ‘phantom picture’ describing the typical hand characteristics in Down syndrome. More detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were presented by Schaumann & Alter (1976), Rodewald (1981). This month (2010) a more detailed updated version of the visualisation became available – featuring 27 characteristics of the hand in Down’s syndrome!

What are the most common hand characteristics in Down syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of a Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the hypothenar zone of the hand (in palmistry a.k.a. ‘mount of moon’); usually this zone a large ‘ulnar loop’ pattern combined with a high positioned palmar axial triradius.

HAND SHAPE:
Short fingers (thumb and pinky finger are often abnormally short) + a square shaped palm.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Down syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in all cases of Down syndrome certain combinations of the 27 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

More details available at:
How to use the famous ‘single palmar crease’ (a.k.a. simian line) as a marker in hand diagnostics!

Photo: example of a baby hand in Down syndrome

Example of a baby hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

Dermatoglyphics & the atom of palm reading - a moment of science!

Dermatoglyphics & the atom of palm reading - a moment of science!

A moment of science: about dermatoglyphics & the ‘atom’ of palm reading!

Scientists may not tell your future from reading your palm. But what they can describe your vulnerability for acquiring certain genetic diseases from your individual palm prints!

Is there really any truth to palm reading? The study of dermatoglyphics – the medical study of the fine skin ridges on your fingertips and palm – can be described as the fundamental basics of modern hand reading.

Today there is no scientific evidence linking the lines on your palm to your fate or fortune. However, scientists have learned that your palm and fingerprints do have a story to tell!

A FEW QUOTES:

“The ridges on your hands, fingers, feet, and toes formed while you were still in the womb, five or six months before you were born. They are the result of stress patterns that formed as your hands and feet developed. Because the growth pattern of every fetus is slightly different, your finger and palm prints are absolutely unique. Even identical twins have slightly different patterns.”

“Many genetic diseases affect the way that the fetus develops. This results in characteristic irregularities in the palm prints. Scientists have statistically linked dozens of genetic diseases to unusual palm prints. Sometimes even viral diseases can leave telltale traces on an infant’s palm.”

“Studies have linked irregular palm prints to such diseases as schizophrenia, fetal alcohol syndrome, and even allergies. While they can’t tell you how long you’ll live or how many children you’ll have, the lines on your palm can tell you something.”

A FEW SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING:

Palm reading – a moment of science!
Hands on cancer: how the reveals varous types of cancers!
The history of fingerprinting!
Biometry: about fingerprints & other hand features!
The hands of Albert Einstein

Hands on the atom of palm reading!