Research: finger length is a predictor for prostate cancer.Earlier this month, British researchers published new research presenting a link between the relative length of the index finger and the risk of developing prostate cancer. In men with an index finger longer than the ring finger the chances are 33% higher for not developing the disease.

Often such studies are qualified by non-experts as “nonsense” – initially because of the association with classical palmistry. Usually a main argument of concern is the seize of the studied sample: many ‘2D:4D digit ratio’ studies have been focused relatively small samples, and usually with the statistics were simly not strong enough to be applied to individuals. But those arguments can not be used to the describe the new British study!

The new British research involves a study where the hands of 1,524 prostate cancer patients were examined, which were compared with a control group of 3,044 men.

It can also be noted that Professor John Manning described in his second book ‘The Finger Book‘ with great details the suspected link between the ‘2D:4D digit ratio’ and prostate cancer – a complex theory about of role glutamine chains in the sensitivity of hormone receptors, which in their turn play a role in the activation of testosterone in the body:

…The various forms of the androgen receptor have important consequences for our health and behaviour. For example, African-American men have shorter glutamine chains (high sensitivity to testosterone) than white men. Short glutamine chains are associated with an increased susceptibility to prostate cancer, and this may in part explain why the incidence of prostate cancer is higher in African-Americans than in white Americans. …”

In short, there seems to exist a triangular relationship between: 1) the high percentage of prostate cancer in Americans with African ancestry, 2) the length of the glutamine chains, and 3) the length ratio between index finger and ring finger.

The importance of the new British study can be recognized in the fact the use of preventive screening for prostate cancer – which is anno 2010 usually done through the use of a blood test – is still an object of confusion. Simply because the benefits of the screening devices are still very unclear. Meanwhile it is a fact that prostate cancer is known as the No. 1 cause of death from cancer in men (see picture below).

The British researchers therefore are speculating about how to add a practical application of their finger length study to the traditional methods of prostate cancer prevention screening!

RELATED SOURCES:
More finger length studies
How to read your own palm!


On december 1 (2007) the CTJ Hand Mime Ministry performed during Geneva’s Filipino Community’s Christmas Party at CEPTA. This performance aimed to send the real message of Christmas: JESUS came to earth to save human kind from sin!

MORE SPIRITUAL ORIENTED ARTICLES ABOUT HANDS:
A Palm Sunday hand reading

Hindu palm readers push you along the spiritual path



MORE ANIMAL XMAS PREPERATIONS:
Wanna know more about how other animals use their hands… and prepair for Christmas?

CHECK:
How the hands of primates explain their social behavior!
More news about the hands of animals

Walt Disney (1901-1966)

Walt Disney became famous for his influence in the field of entertainment during the 20th century. The corporation he co-founded, now known as The Walt Disney Company, today has annual revenues of approximately U.S. $35 billion. Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse belong to his world famous creatures. Today you can also meet them at Disney World!

Interestingly, his fingerprints reveal that this exceptionally creative genius had a very rare  fingerprint pattern on his right forefinger:  a Central Pocket Loop Type Whorl pattern (CM).

Via the high-r version of Walt Disney’s fingerprints you can study the details!

 More famous hands & fingerprints!

Walt Disney’s fingerprints:

Walt Disney's fingerprints.

Would these guys get ‘life sentence’ in Dubai?

DUBAI, 2010 – A British expatriate in Dubai is facing jail and deportation after being accused of making a single-finger gesture in an argument. Simon Andrews, 56, has had his passport confiscated for almost eight months while waiting for his case to be heard.

He told Dubai Court of Misdemeanours he denies “flipping the finger” at Mahmoud Rasheed, an Iraqi aviation student, during an argument. He will appear in court on Sunday for a full hearing of the case.

Mr Andrews has said Mr Rasheed, who has not yet appeared in court to give evidence, is mistaken and no finger was raised. At a court hearing on Sunday, he asked for the passport put up as bail surety for him by a friend to be returned as the friend had to go abroad for work.

He was told to provide another passport in its place. His own passport has also been confiscated, preventing him leaving Dubai before the case is heard. Making insulting gestures is regarded as unacceptable, and carries with it the possibility of a jail sentence of up to six months and deportation.

MORE HAND GESTURES NEWS!

Be aware… in other places ‘the finger’ may just be given for fun – featured with a big smile!

The V-sign: gesture for ‘victory’… or ‘insult’!

Since Winston Churchill’s use of the ‘V-sign’ in 1941,  this gesture is generally recognized as a sign for ‘victory’. But outside the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia few people are aware of the insulting version of almost the same gesture: a ‘v-sign with the palm inwards’, which is often recognized as an alternative for ‘the finger’. Earlier this month British scientists found that finger length is involved in the severity of the insulting version of the V-gesture.

DECEMBER 2010 REPORT:

Scientists at the recent FIFA meeting that awarded the 2018 World Cup to Russia have discovered that people with long middle fingers are capable of increasing the severity of the traditional two-fingered ‘V gesture – with the palm inwards’.

‘Prince William’s gesture was noticeably more aggressive than that of David Cameron, who has a relatively short middle finger,’ said Professor Thomas Boycott from Cambridge. ’The Prince’s gesture was a clear ‘Fuck you, you lying twat with knobs on’, whilst Cameron’s was more ‘Up yours, you stupid tosser’.’

V-signs have been given throughout history, with long-fingered people performing best. Short-fingered Winston Churchill’s gesture when telling journalists to  stop taking photographs was incorrectly taken as a ’V for Victory’.

‘Then again,’ added Boycott, ‘what about that short-fingered man who swerved to avoid me this morning and merely gestured to indicate I should eat a hot dog with plenty of ketchup on it? Most peculiar, in the circumstances.’

MORE HAND GESTURES NEWS!
MORE FAMOUS HAND GESTURES!

Chinese story about the leg that saved a hand!

NOVEMBER 2010: Ming Li, a Chinese 9-year girl, lost her hand when she was run over by a tractor. Doctors could not reattach the hand straight away, so instead grafted it on to her right leg to keep it alive until the operation was possible. After 3 months the hand was rejoined to her wrist using nerves and skin from her leg.

Doctor Hou shared his optimistic perspective for the girl: “After the surgeries and with enough hand training, her left hand could resume most of its functions.”

The photo below brings the good news: Ming Li is doing fine, with good circulation and she can move her wrist in a normal fashion.

MORE WEIRD HAND NEWS!

An impression from the Wellcome Collection hands-event in London!

Hands….where would we be without them?

At november 26 the Wellcome Collection in Lond presented their ‘hands’-event. Tabitha Langton-Lockton was one of the participants in the event and she wrote an impressive review:

Can you imagine a society without hands? Frankly, no. For this would mean a world without Twitter, Facebook and YouTube; heavens forbid a world without art and literature, for how would we paint, write and type? 

The Wellcome Collection plays host to an event, ‘Hands’, celebrating these odd looking appendages with an evening of music, magic and science. In the foyer visitors play the piano and pinball machine whilst waiting for the main event to open. Gigantic cardboard hands loom by the entrance and people animatedly express themselves with their hands as they queued for the ticketed events. Hands are everywhere.

A talk by Chris McManus takes place in the auditorium. Accompanied by a British Sign Language interpreter, McManus explains the science that differs between the left and right-handed. As a right-handed individual, I was disappointed to find out that all ‘lefties’ were not in fact evil as I had previously been led to believe. A later talk by the evolution expert Christophe Soligo explains how hands have developed and changed over time. Both talks are educational and thought-provoking.

The wonder of hands continues to be celebrated on all floors. Climbing the stairs, white-gloved men greet visitors with a shake of the hand and subtly (but unsuccessfully) try to place a sticker on their arms without them noticing.

On the first floor, areas dedicated to the event could be found whilst wandering around the current exhibitions. The Nail Bar proves popular with the ladies (although I did spy a suited man waiting patiently for his turn) whilst the prosthetics and medical tools appeal more to the gruesome individuals.

A neuroscientist asks me to place my right hand inside a black box and look at a rubber hand. He then proceeded to poke and stroke me resulting in my questioning my senses and walking away feeling distinctly confused. Had he been poking my hand or the rubbery hand? 

Turning a corner I found what I was looking for – the palmistry section. After having my palms read by an amateur reader from the Collection library I plucked up the courage to ask if he could see children in my future. “I think that you might have two”. “Damn” I muttered, “I was hoping for at least three”.

The second floor becomes a surgery for the evening. Here, surgeons from Imperial College perform the art of stitching a wound, whilst showing the crowd how hands save lives. Visitors were able to try their hands at surgery and to see for themselves just how steady the hand must be to perform operations.

‘Hands’ shows the visitor just how essential they are in everyday life. The evening appealed to all ages and amused and educated its audience.

• Famous stories about strang hands: Charles Darwin
• The Wellcome Collection presents their HANDS-event (official announcement)