A 'family tree' of the major major lines.

In 2004 Chinese researchers present a new approach to study the hand lines for biometric purposes. They applied a mathematical model on hand prints and were able to identify six types of  palmar crease variations – based on the core characteristics of the three ‘major palmar lines’. Recently, in line with the Chinese research a new more advanced (PIC) model was introduced which e.g. describes 21 types of major hand line variations which are displayed in ‘a family tree of the major hand line types': see the picture above.

Interestingly, the new study reports e.g. about a correlation between the palmar lines and intelligence (IQ): left hand vs. right hand asymmetries appear to be involved, plus a lower prevalence of MPA’s – such as the simian line & Sydney line).

More details are available in the article:
What can formations in hand lines reveal?

For more information about various aspects of the palmar lines the following book is recommended:
‘Anthropology of Crease Morphogenesis’.

NOTICE: The three major palmar lines concern:

- The ‘radial longitudinal crease’, in palmistry a.k.a. the ‘life line';
– The ‘distal transversal crease’, in palmistry a.k.a. the ‘heart line';
– The ‘proximal transveral crease’, in palmistry a.k.a. the ‘head line’.

Related news reports & articles are available at:
News about the palmar creases / hand lines.

The family tree of fingerprint types

In 1943 Cummins & Midlo presented a work which became known as the Bible of fingerprints, titled: “Finger Prints, Palms and Soles”. The book is e.g. featured with a model named: ‘a family tree of finger print types': see the picture above.

This ‘family tree’ presents an interesting perspective on how various types of fingerprints are related. Starting with the ‘concentric whorl’ (which sort of raises associations with various phenomena – such as: a solar system in the cosmos, or force fields in the atmosphere, hair streams on the human body, etc.), progressing via the ‘loop’, and ending with the ‘simple arch’ (which raises associations with more stable, inert phenomena).

At Amazon you can order a copy of ‘Finger prints, Palms and Soles’, or another fingerprint book (such as: ‘The Science of Fingerprints’ – a FBI production). For more details about the book, see: Google books & Ed Campbell’s article ‘Fingerprints & Palmar Dermatoglyphics.

Related news reports & articles are available at:                                           Fingerprints &  dermatoglyphics news.