Marfan syndrome is known for a rather unusual tendency to display elongated skeletal features [in medical science they call it 'dalichostenomelia']. ‘Spider fingers’ [arachnodactly] is probably the most common known body characteristic typical for Marfan syndrome. Recently, an innovative hand-test was developed in order to identify Marfan syndrome via  the hand – with the purpose to provide a ‘handy’ & costless screening tool to help identify those who have disorder (estimates are that about half of Marfan people are undiagnosed).

This brand new ‘Marfan Syndrome Hand Test’ (see above) provides you a unique opportunity to make a first check-up for Marfan syndrome via your own hands.

So far the hand-test has been validated with the help of a dozen of Marfan people – 73% of those passed the test (and the other 27% ended up in the ‘borderline’ category which is typical for various syndromes that have overlap with Marfan syndrome, such as: Loeys-Dietz syndrome & Ehler-Danlos syndrome).

The most discriminating hand featured typical for Marfan syndrome are included in this test.

More details about the hand in Marfan syndrome and the background of this test are presented at HandResearch.com:
http://www.handresearch.com/diagnostics/marfan-syndrome-hand-test.htm 

(Your thoughts & observations are welcome!) 

Ratko Mladic – who is a.k.a. as ‘the Butcher of Bosnia’ – is the former Chief of Staff of the Army of the Republika Srpska (the Bosnian Serb Army) during the Bosnian War 1992–1995.

In 1995, he was indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. He was a fugitive until he was arrested by Serbian security forces on May 26, 2011 in Lazarevo, Serbia.

MANY MORE PHOTO GALLERY & HAND STORIES ARE AVAILABLE HERE:
http://www.handresearch.com/hands-of-fame.htm



Ratko Mladic after his arrest in may 2011:

Ratko Mladic at the Bosnia Tribunal, The Hague - may 2011.

Marfan syndrome can be understood as a connective tissue disorder – which relates to the tissue that strengthens the body. The syndrome is usually featured with a tall, slender body with long limbs & extremely long, thin fingers & toes. The most serious complications are the defects of the heart valves and the aorta, which could lead to an aortic rupture (due to too much stress on the aorta), which is usually fatal. But many people who have this disorder are not aware of it! This is partly because Marfan syndrome typically becomes manifest only after the age of 5. But there are many hand signs that have a highly reliable diagnostic value!

Marfan syndrome is featured with many typical hand characteristics, however a combination of two specific hands signs related to a long hand shape (hand signs) & hand motorics (joint hypermobility) is often enough to identify the disorder.

The Steinberg sign & Walker-Murdoch sign.

THE STEINBERG SIGN (a):

This test is used for the clinical evaluation of Marfan patients.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to fold his thumb into the closed fist. This test is positive if the thumb tip extends from palm of hand (see figure a).

THE WALKER-MURDOCH SIGN (b):

This test is used for the evaluation of patients with Marfan syndrome.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to grip his wrist with his opposite hand. If thumb and fifth finger of the hand overlap with each other, this represents a positive Walker-Murdoch sign (see figure b).


JOINT HYPERMOBILITY

How to check if a person has hypermobility? You can check this easily by doing the 5 tests that are included in the so-called ‘Beighton score‘: see figure 1.

A ‘Beighton score’ of 4 or above usually indicates hypermobility.

And if a person has the Sternberg sign + Walker-Murdoch sign + hypermobility, the chances are above 90% that the person has Marfan syndrome.

The presence of other related hand markers such as: skin quality (hyperextensiblity), a simian crease, extra digital transverse creases, or a high positioned axial triradius provide other significant hand signs which are indicative for a person to have a medical test for Marfan syndrome.

A typical 'Marfan' hand gesture!



What discriminates ‘Multi-Perspective Palm Reading’ from all other approaches in the field of hand reading?

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading is a new type of hand reading that is rising from scientific research reports that relate to the hand as a ‘diagnostic tool’. The unique characteristic of this advanced type of palm reading is that it only includes hand markers which have been confirmed to have significant value according scientific studies. So this NEXT NATURE variant of ‘palmistry’ is not connected anyhow with astrology nor any other philosophic system.

In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading is the hand studied from 7 different perspectives in order to make an assessment for various specified themes – which can result in either a confirming- or prognostic ‘hand-diagnosis’.


The philosophy behind Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

The philosophy behind this new advanced type of hand reading can be described as follows:

“In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, a reliable hand-diagnosis is only possible when a pair of hands displays ‘diagnostic clues’ in MULTIPLE perspectives of the hand. According Multi-Perspective Palm Reading a person typically requires to have ‘diagnostic clues’ in at least 3 perspectives of his/her hands, before one can speak of a solid, specified hand-diagnosis.

The application of this philosophy in the practice for making a hand assessment can be understood by studying the role of the simian line in hand diagnostics. In the 20th century the simian line (the most well known of all palm line variations: a.k.a. the single palmar transverse crease or simian crease) became known as a diagnostic marker for Down syndrome. However, during the past decades this uncommon hand marker was recognized as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ that has diagnostic value for other syndromes, diseases & developmental problems. But in order to specify it’s significance as a major hand line for the individual that has this characteristic in one or both hands, a study of the other perspectives of the hand is required!


The 7 perspectives used in Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

In the following seven perspectives are required to be studied in order to make a thorough hand assessment:

1 – Palm Reading & the HAND SHAPE, including e.g.: hand index, palm shape, hand length, hand breath.

2 – Palm Reading & the FINGERNAILS, including e.g.: color, morphology, structure, growth.

3 – Palm Reading & FINGER MORPHOLOGY, including e.g.: finger length, 2D:4D ratio, variations in shape & width.

4 – Palm Reading & the MAJOR LINES, including e.g.: primary creases, secundary creases, tertairy creases & accessory lines.

5 – Palm Reading & the DERMATOGLYPHICS, including e.g.: fingerprints, palmar dermatoglyphics.

6 – Palm Reading & SKIN QUALITY, including e.g.: colour, structure, flexure / tone.

7 – Palm Reading & HAND MOTORICS, including e.g.: flexibility, motoric hand index.

Read more about how Multi-Perspective Palm Reading varies from other types of hand reading & modern palmistry via the Wikipedia section: Modern Palmistry: science & criticism

Three generations of hands in the Royal Family of Wales!

Later today (april 29) Prince William of Wales and his future wife Kate Middleton will celebrate their Royal wedding! Let’s take a look at the remarkable characteristics – differences & similarities – with the direct anchestors: Prince Charles & Lady Diana (RIP), and Queen Elizabeth II & her husband Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh.

What do you think of their hands? Do you spot any rather remarkable characteristics?
 
 
 
A hand photo gallery is also available in the section Celebrity Hands.

GreenPeace presented this ‘Give Earth a hand’-video on EARTH DAY 2011 (april 22) to make a statement about their worries about how human kind is exploiting ‘their’ planet.

The statement featured with the video is the following:

“This fragile Earth deserves a voice. It needs solutions. It needs change. It needs you.”

FIND MANY MORE GREAT HAND ART PROJECTS AT:

http://www.modernhandreadingforum.com/f21-viif-discussions-about-art-related-to-hands

When you’re far from home, even what you’d assume to be the most universal gesture might mean something completely different than you’d expect. It’s a concept explored in the book Don’t Get Me Wrong! – The Global Gestures Guide with helpful pictures by photographer Florian Bong-Kil Grosse. The book is published by Julia Grosse and Judith Reker and Bierke Publishing, and will also be introduced to beleaguered travellers as a handy iPhone app ($1.99). For example, in Turkey this gesture is a positive, upbeat physical expression that means “beautiful” or “good.”

This entertaining publication takes all those by the hand who are curious about the diversity of communication. Two foreign correspondents have gathered everyday hand gestures from around 50 countries, from Australia to Zimbabwe. The results, beautifully captured in nearly 80 colour photographs, are often amusing and always instructive. With its original design, stunning finish and handy format, ‘Don’t Get Me Wrong!’ makes for a cool and compact travel companion. Beautifully designed by a team of award-winning art book designers, the gestures from around 50 countries were researched and collected by two well-travelled journalists.
 
You can order the book at:
Don’t Get Me Wrong: The Global Gestures Guide
 
A Life.com photo gallery from the book is available at:
http://www.life.com/gallery/58041/dont-get-me-wrong-global-gestures#index/0
 
More reports about hand gestures are available at:
http://www.handresearch.com/news/hand-gestures.htm
.
An overview of some international ‘angry’ hand gestures:

A trigger finger is a common disorder of later adulthood characterized by catching, snapping or locking of the involved finger flexor tendon, associated with dysfunction and pain. In the video above hand surgeon Dr. Neema Amin (John Randolph Medical Center) describes treatment options and when to seek medical attention when the trigger finger gets more frequent or painful.

What causes trigger finger – a.k.a. stenosing tenosynovitis?

Causes for this condition are not always clear. Some trigger fingers are associated with medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and diabetes. Local trauma to the palm/base of the finger may be a factor on occasion, but in most cases there is not a clear cause.

Learn more about the role of a trigger finger in a hand assessment for Diabetes Mellitus or Rheumatoid Arthritis:

28 Hand characteristics in Rheumatoid Arthritis
33 Hand characteristics in Diabetes Millitus

The “Preacher Sign” involves the inability to flatten the hands against each other – a hand characteristic that is frequently seen in diabetes mellitus patients.

Diabetes mellitus belongs to a category of diseases that is known for having quite a few hand markers that ‘signal’ the development of the disease. Type 1 and type 2 have many common characteristics regarding the hands, but one has to be aware that some of them are limited to only one variant of the disease.

The most revealing dimensions of the hand in diabeter are: the MOTORICS (including the “Preacher Sign”), the FINGERNAILS, the SKIN QUALITY & the DERMATOGLYPHICS. And even the notorious simian crease is about twice to four times more often seen among diabetic patients – compared to the general population.
The following article presents an overview of 33 hand markers for Diabetes Mellitis – type 2 (all reported features have been confirms as ‘signficant’ in various scientific studies:
 
 
(A ‘phantom picture’ for the hand in diabetes will become available later)

Another Mubarak hand-cartoon – suggestion for a new flag for Egypt with the motto:

‘Egypt send it’s last dictator away!’

 

MORE MUBARAK HAND CARTOONS:

Mubarak & Obama try to jumpstart the Middle East peace process